Product Spotlight - Over 50s Multivitamin

Coming soon our brand new multivitamin for the over 50s, today we are featuring this product to announce its arrival. We’ll discuss the nutrients within the formula and why it has been designed for people over the age of 50 years.

About the tablet and dosage

Our over 50’s formulation is a 1200mg tablet which is 18mm or 1.8cm in length. We recommend taking 1 tablet twice a day to improve vitality.

Nutrients

Below is the nutrient breakdown of our over 50s multivitamin.

Nutrient

Nutrient

Biotin

Vitamin B3

Calcium

Vitamin B5

Chromium

Vitamin B6

Copper

Vitamin C

Folic Acid

Vitamin E

Iodine

Vitamin K2

Iron

Zinc

Maca

Vitamin B12

Manganese

Ginseng

Selenium

Vitamin D3

Vitamin A

Vitamin B2


Here are the areas we wanted to focus on when creating this formulation:

Bone Health

According to research peak bone mass is reached by the age of 18 years in females and 20 years for males. Then from around the age of 50+years, we start to see a decrease in this bone mass.

*Photo source - https://openstax.org/books/anatomy-and-physiology/pages/6-6-exercise-nutrition-hormones-and -bone-tissue

This is accelerated in women due to the end of menarche otherwise known as menopause. According to NICE, each year, almost a third of over 65s fall at least once and there are an estimated 500,000 fragility fractures. It is therefore of utmost importance to support bone health with good nutrition. This why we have included the following nutrients:

●  Calcium

●  Vitamin D

●  Manganese

●  Zinc

●  Vitamin K

Each has an EFSA* approved health claim that they can ‘‘contributes to the maintenance of normal bones’. Moreover, calcium carries an additional claim of ‘ Calcium helps to reduce the loss of bone mineral in post-menopausal women’. Low bone mineral density is a risk factor for osteoporotic bone fractures’, this claim can be used for products with a dosage of 400mg. Studies using vitamin D and calcium have shown a significant decrease in fractures. In addition to this, vitamin D trials have shown a decrease in bone turnover and improvements in bone mineral density.

Cognitive and neural health

Typically we associate the decline of cognitive processes with older age. The truth is that good longterm brain and neural health starts in the younger years. Particularly when it comes to nutrition. This why we have included the following nutrients:

●  Iodine

●  Iron

●  Zinc

●  Biotin

●  Copper

●  Vitamin B2

●  Vitamin B3

●  Vitamin B6

●  Vitamin B12

These carry the following EFSA* claims ‘contributes to normal cognitive function’ and/or ‘contributes to the normal functioning of the nervous system’. The exact cause of cognitive decline is yet unknown therefore it would be irresponsible to declare that nutrition is the only factor in developing diseases. That being said there is some strong evidence to suggest that they play a small part in the process. Some studies have found that lower Vitamin B12 is associated with a great risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. There is contradictory evidence on the use of Vitamin B complex supplementation and its effects on disease onset. That being said, one study found a beneficial effect of a vitamin B complex supplement in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in the cerebral grey matter.

Despite ginseng not being a conventional factor in nutrition, it does carry an on hold health claim for the following, ‘helps to maintain good cognitive performance, supports memory performance and contributes to normal blood circulation, which is associated with brain performance and reactivity. A 2018 study reviewed the use of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease patients to improve the outcome of the disease and help to alleviate symptoms. They found that the active compounds of ginseng help to improve cognitive function, prevent learning impairments and reduce amyloid plaque deposits. That being said a lot of work must be done to allow for clinical acceptance of ginseng as a conventional Alzheimer’s disease drug.

Immune Health

As we age our immune system becomes less efficacious and efficient. Our immune system is governed by white blood cells, as we age our body is unable to make T and B lymphocytes (white blood cells) as rapidly as a younger person. To support a healthy immune system we have included the following nutrients:

●  Copper

●  Vitamin B9/Folic acid

●  Iron

●  Selenium

●  Vitamin A

●  Vitamin B12

●  Vitamin B6

●  Vitamin C

●  Vitamin D

●  Zinc

The above nutrients carry the following EFSA* approved health claim ‘contributes to the normal function of the immune system’. One study found that people with zinc deficiencies have greater susceptibility for pathogenic disease. Whereas one study found that ‘The deficiency of a number of nutrients have been linked to immune function, notably vitamin A, vitamin C and zinc, vitamin B6, iron and copper and selenium.’ Further to this, studies show that a viitamin A deficiency was associated with reduced immune function.

What to expect from our tablets?

We are considered one of the leading independent dietary supplements companies within the UK. The facility we use to manufacture our supplements is an approved facility with FSSC ISO 22000 certification. This means that our facility operates on a precautionary principle and are supported by a range of on-site audits and product testing. Our suppliers are also required to meet a range of quality, safety, environmental and social standards.

*EFSA - European food safety authority.

WRITTEN BY HARRIET HUNTER, ANUTR. NUTRITIONIST

Resources

●  https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/labelling_nutrition/claims/register/public/?event=search

●  https://www.bones.nih.gov/health-info/bone/osteoporosis/bone-mass

●  https://www.nice.org.uk/Media/Default/About/what-we-do/Into-practice/measuring-uptake/NICE-Impact-falls-and-fragility-fractures.pdf

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21872800

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3582124/

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28005419

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6190533/

●  https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00282/full

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3320807/

●  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696230/